Summer Graduate Programs

July 07, 2014 - July 18, 2014
Abstract

This summer school will focus on the theory, mathematical modeling and experimental study of biological rhythms. The workshop will begin with a bootcamp introducing the basic mathematical tools and techniques used in studying biological rhythms. In depth explorations of specific problems will then be presented. Students will also work in small groups on projects, which will be presented at the end of the two week workshop.

All applicants selected for the MBI Summer Graduate Program will receive lodging (single dorm room) and a campus meal card loaded with daily breakfast, lunch and dinner through their entire stay.  Also, selected applicants will receive partial reimbursement for travel expenses. There is no tuition charged to summer school participants.

Apply by March 3rd, 2014 for full consideration.



June 02, 2014 - June 13, 2014
Abstract

Tutorials, computer labs, and short-term team efforts designed to introduce students to a variety of topics in mathematical biology.

June 18, 2012 - June 29, 2012
Abstract

The Workshop will be held at the Mathematical Biosciences Institute and will have instructors from across North America whose research expertise is stochastic modeling in biological systems. Some of the topics to be covered include Markov chains, birth and death processes, branching processes, Brownian motion and diffusion processes, stochastic differential equations, and agent-based models. Applications of stochastic processes will come from epidemiology, ecology, phylogenetics, microbiology, evolutionary biology, and genetics. The workshop will consist of lectures on mathematical and statistical methods for stochastic processes in biological systems and daily computer and analysis activities. In addition, each student will work on a research project over the duration of the program with a team of four or five participants. Applications received by January 13, 2012 will receive full consideration. Members of the organizing committee are: Linda Allen (Texas Tech), Laura Kubatko (Ohio State University), Suzanne Lenhart (University of Tennessee, Knoxville); Libby Marschall (Ohio State University), and Lea Popovic (Concordia University).

July 25, 2011 - August 05, 2011
Abstract

Joint 2011 MBI-NIMBioS-CAMBAM Summer Graduate Program Mathematical Ecology and Evolution The 2011 Summer Graduate Program will be held at the Mathematical Biosciences Institute from July 25 to August 5, 2011. Summer school topics will include infectious disease, resource management, invasive species and evolution biology. Members of the organizing committee are: Fred Guichard (McGill University); Suzanne Lenhart (University of Tennessee at Knoxville); Yuan Lou (Ohio State University); and Libby Marschall (Ohio State University).

The Program will feature a number of researchers from the mathematical and biological sciences, each of them will work with the students for one day. The speakers will lecture in the mornings, followed by afternoon computer and analysis activity including work on projects. During the summer program each student is expected to work on one research project in a team of four or five participants. The following is a partial list of speakers:

* Linda Allen and Ed Allen, Texas Tech

* Chris Cosner, University of Miami

* Fred Guichard, McGill University

* Ian Hamilton, Ohio State University

* Alan Hastings, University of California at Davis

* Suzanne Lenhart, University of Tennessee at Knoxville

* Lea Popovic, Concordia University

* Joe Tien, Ohio State University

Graduate students from the mathematical, physical and life sciences are encouraged to apply. Application link will be posted soon. You will be asked to submit the following three items:

1. CV

2. Statement of your research interests (up to one page).

3. At least one letter of recommendation, addressing your academic background and suitability for the program.

Applications received by March 15, 2011 will receive full consideration. The Joint 2011 MBI-NIMBioS-CAMBAM Summer Graduate Program is a satellite summer school of ICIAM 2011, Vancouver BC, July 18-22, 2011 (http://www.iciam2011.com/).

June 27, 2009 - August 14, 2009
Abstract

This year the program will focus on Mathematical Ecology and Evolution. The program leaders are Ian Hamilton (Department of Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology, Ohio State University) and Yuan Lou (Department of Mathematics, Ohio State University).

The first week is spent in a tutorial, which combines morning lectures with active learning laboratories in the afternoon. Dr. Hamilton will give five lectures on the evolutionary ecology of interacting phenotypes, including such topics as the use of game theory in evolutionary ecology, levels of selection, the evolution of cooperation, competition and predator-prey games. Dr. Lou will give five lectures on the theory of Adaptive Dynamics with applications to the evolution of dispersal, consumer-resource models and the evolution of virulence.

The following two weeks are spent working on guided team projects and participating in a mini-conference to share project results. The program is meant primarily for graduate students; college instructors and qualified undergraduates will also be considered. Team projects include the following topics:

  1. Maintenance of variation in mate choice and mate quality
  2. Sanctions and cooperative behavior
  3. Evolution of dispersal in heterogeneous landscapes
  4. Evolution of virulence
July 07, 2008 - July 25, 2008
Abstract

This year the program will focus on Mathematical Bioengineering. The first week is spent in a tutorial, which combines morning lectures with active learning laboratories in the afternoon. The following two weeks are spent working on guided team projects and participating in a mini-conference to share project results. The program is meant primarily for graduate students; college instructors and qualified undergraduates will also be considered.

The 2008 Summer Program dates are July 7 - 25.

July 7-11, 2008
Lecturer: Richard Bertram, Department of Mathematics, Florida State University
Title: Mathematical Modeling in Neuroscience and Physiology

In these lectures Bertram will discuss examples of how mathematical modeling is used in the areas of neuroscience and physiology. Topics include the dynamics of electrically excitable cells, calcium dynamics and waves, fast and slow time scales, bursting oscillations, phase oscillators, circadian gene oscillations, and synchronization of oscillators. A basic familiarity with ordinary and partial differential equations is assumed. Techniques for the analysis of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using phase plane and bifurcation diagrams will be discussed throughout the series of lectures.

Monday: We will begin with a description of neuron models and mean field models for neural populations. Analysis of these models through phase plane and bifurcation analysis will also be discussed.

Tuesday: We will discuss the biophysical mechanisms for and mathematical analysis of bursting oscillations. Oscillations of this type are frequently observed in nerve and endocrine cells.

Wednesday: The next discussion will be on mathematical descriptions of stochastic systems. We will look at stochastic ion channel fluctuations in nerve cells, and hybrid deterministic models that include noise. We will also discuss ways that noise itself can amplify a signal, such as stochastic resonance.

Thursday: Memory is stored in synaptic couplings between neurons. A synapse is a tiny structure that is the center of many reactions that are key to short term and long term memory. We will discuss mathematical models for the mechanisms of both types of memory.

Friday: Synchronization is a widespread phenomenon in neural populations. We will discuss some of the ways that synchronization has been analyzed mathematically, using the phase oscillator as a mathematical tool for the analysis.

July 23, 2007 - August 10, 2007
Abstract

This year the program will focus on Systems Physiology. The program leaders are Jim Keener and Chiu-Yen Kao. The first week is spent in a tutorial, which combines morning lectures with active learning laboratories in the afternoon. The following two weeks are spent working on guided team projects and participating in a mini-conference to share project results. The program is meant primarily for graduate students; college instructors and qualified undergraduates will also be considered.

The 2007 Summer Program dates are July 23 - August 10.

Lecturer: Jim Keener
Title: Mathematical Physiology

In these lectures Keener will give an introduction to mathematical models of cellular physiological processes, based on material found in Keener and Sneyd, Mathematical Physiology. Included will be discussion of enzyme kinetics and biochemical reaction networks, cellular transport processes (channels, transporters, ATPases), membrane excitability, calcium signaling, cell regulatory processes, bursting and secretion, cellular communication and coupling, and waves in continuous and discrete media. The lectures will assume familiarity with ordinary and partial differential equations, and some understanding of stochastic processes (Markov processes).

July 17, 2006 - August 04, 2006
Abstract

This year the program will focus on Ecology and Evolution. The program leaders are Kate Calder and Yuan Lou. The first week is spent in a tutorial, which combines morning lectures with active learning laboratories in the afternoon. The following two weeks are spent working on guided team projects and participating in a mini-conference to share project results. The program is meant primarily for graduate students; college instructors and qualified undergraduates will also be considered.

The 2006 Summer Program dates are July 17 - August 4.

Topics:

  • Effects of spatial heterogeneity on invasions of rare species
  • Patterns of multiallelic polymorphism maintained by migration and selection
  • Evolution of ranges of species
  • Spatial modeling of trends in species abundance
  • Modeling wild bird population dynamics from citizen surveys
  • Constructing the progression pathway from normal tissue to carcinoma
August 01, 2005 - August 19, 2005
Abstract

This year the program will focus on Microarray Gene Expression Data Analysis. The program leaders are Shili Lin and Joseph Verducci. The first week is spent in a tutorial, which combines morning lectures with active learning laboratories in the afternoon. The following two weeks are spent working on guided team projects and participating in a mini-conference to share project results. The program is meant primarily for graduate students; college instructors and qualified undergraduates will also be considered.

The 2005 Summer Program dates are August 1 - 19.

Mentors

  • Statistics Mentors: Shili Lin and Joe Verducci
  • Computational Mentors: Victor Jin, Greg Singer, and Ramana Davuluri
  • Wet Lab Leaders: Pearlly Yan, Michael Chan, and Alfred Cheng
August 02, 2004 - August 20, 2004
Abstract

This year the program will focus on Cell Processes. The program leader is Professor James Sneyd. After an introductory tutorial and discussion in the first two days, the participants will be divided into teams of five, with each team being led by an MBI postdoc. Teams will work on one project for the first two and a half weeks, and there will be a miniconference in the final two days.

During the three-week period there will also be several general talks on cell cycle and proliferation by active researchers and visits to bioscience labs.

July 14, 2003 - August 01, 2003
Abstract

Each summer the MBI hosts a 3-week education program. The first week is spent in a tutorial, which combines morning lectures with active learning laboratories in the afternoon. The following 2 weeks are spent working on guided team projects and participating in a mini-conference to share project results. The 40 participants include 10 undergraduate students, 10 graduate students, 10 college teachers, and 10 high school teachers.

The 2003 summer program in Neuronal Rhythms is scheduled for July 14th to August 1st.