Current Topic Workshop: Blackwell-Tapia Conference

(November 5,2010 - November 6,2010 )

Organizers


Juan Meza
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, High Performance Computing Research
Cheri Shakiban
Institute for Mathematics and its Applications, University of Minnesota

This is the sixth in a series of biannual conferences honoring David Blackwell and Richard Tapia, two seminal figures who inspired a generation of African-American, Native American and Latino/Latina students to pursue careers in mathematics.

Carrying forward their work, this one and a half day conference will:

  • Recognize and showcase mathematical excellence by minority researchers
  • Recognize and disseminate successful efforts to address under-representation
  • Inform students and mathematicians about career opportunities in mathematics, especially outside academia
  • Provide networking opportunities for mathematical researchers at all points in the higher education/career trajectory

The conference will include a mix of activities including scientific talks; poster presentations; a panel discussion of career opportunities in mathematics, and another panel on recruitment and retention of a diverse mathematics workforce; and ample opportunities for discussion and interaction.

2010 Blackwell-Tapia Prize: The National Blackwell-Tapia Committee is pleased to announce that the 2010 Blackwell-Tapia Prize will be awarded to Dr. Trachette Jackson (Department of Mathematics, University of Michigan). This prize is awarded every second year in honor of the legacy of David H. Blackwell and Richard A. Tapia.

Special Event: Dr. Richard Tapia will give a public lecture at the Columbus Science Museum (COSI) on Thursday evening November 4 at 7:00pm. Admission is free and the public is welcome.

Accepted Speakers

Emery Brown
Computational Neuroscience, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Carlos Castillo-Chavez
MCMSC, Arizona State University
Ariel Cintron-Arias
Mathematics and Statistics, East Tennessee State University
Ricardo Cortez
Mathematics Dept., Tulane University
James Donaldson
College of Arts and Sciences, Howard University
Edray Goins
Department of Mathematics, Purdue University
Illya Hicks
Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University
Ryan Hynd
CIMS, New York University
Trachette Jackson
Department of Mathematics, University of Michigan
William Massey
Operations Research and Financial Engineering, Princeton University
Juan Restrepo
Department of Mathematics, University of Arizona
Conner Sandefur
Ctr. for Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan
Stephanie Somersille
Mathematics, University of Texas at Austin
Richard Tapia
Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University
Miranda Teboh-Ewungkem
Department of Mathematics, Lafayette College
Maria Vazquez
Dept. of Mathematics, San Francisco State University
Talitha Washington
Mathematics, University of Evansville
Friday, November 5, 2010
Time Session
12:00 AM
11:00 AM
- Yes, Even You Can Bend It Like Beckham
In the 2002 film by Gurinder Chadha, character Jesminder 'Jess' Bhamra states "No one can cross a ball or bend it like Beckham" in a reference to the international soccer star's ability to cause the ball to swerve. French researchers Guillaume Dupeux, Anne Le Goff, David Quere and Christophe Clanet published a paper earlier this year in the New Journal of Physics detailing both experimental and mathematical analyses of a spinning ball in a fluid to show that it must follow a spiral. In this talk, we give an overview of their discussion by reviewing the Navier-Stokes equation in a Serret-Frenet coordinate system. This talk is dedicated to the memory of Angela Grant and her love of mathematics in sports.
01:00 PM
01:40 PM
Ricardo Cortez - Simulation of flagellar motions using regularization methods
Biological flows, such as those surrounding swimming microorganisms, can be properly modeled using the Stokes equations for fluid motion with external forcing. The organism surfaces can be viewed as flexible interfaces imparting force or torque on the fluid. Interesting flows have been observed when the organism swims near a solid wall due to the hydrodynamic interaction of rotating flagella with a neighboring solid surface. I will present the Method of Regularized Stokeslets and some extensions of it that are used to compute these flows. The method includes the use of regularized rotlets and a system of images that exactly cancels the fluid velocity at the wall. The results show features such as an attraction towards the surface and rotations that generate a drag force that allows the flagellum to roll along the surface. Other computed flows resemble observed features of the flow when organisms are near the bottom of the plate in an experimental setting.
01:45 PM
02:05 PM
Talitha Washington - Galloping Gertie Revisited: Demystifying the Collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge
The Tacoma Narrows Bridge opened on July 1, 1940 in the state of Washington. The bridge earned the name "Galloping Gertie" because it could be seen oscillating up and down. On November 7, 1940, wind gusts with speeds of only 40 miles per hour caused the bridge to collapse into the Pugent Sound. In 1999, Dr. P. Joseph McKenna presented a model that described the bridge's motion and reasons for its collapse. Since his model negated previous theories, a "genteel professorial catfight" broke out between McKenna and some engineers. This talk will examine theories and controversy that surround the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. This debate still persists in many undergraduate textbooks.
03:15 PM
03:55 PM
Illya Hicks - Optimization Techniques for Scheduling Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy for Early Stage Breast Cancer
Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the United States. Cancer treatments can be classified as local or systemic. Endocrine therapy is one form of systemic treatment for breast cancer. In this talk we utilize data from published clinical trial results in a mixed integer nonlinear programming model in order to detect an optimal treatment plan. The objective is to maximize the disease-free survival percentage at the end of the treatment subject to constraints dictated by the risk of several side effects. This joint work with Sera Kahruman, Elif Ulusal, Sergiy Butenko, and Kathleen Diehl.
04:00 PM
04:20 PM
Maria Vazquez - Modeling DNA unlinking
Multiple cellular processes, such as DNA replication and transcription, affect the topology of DNA. Controlling these changes is key to ensuring stability inside the cell. Changes in DNA topology are mediated by enzymes, such as topoisomerases and site-specific recombinases. We use techniques from knot theory and low-dimensional topology, aided by computational tools, to analyze the action of such enzymes.

I will here present recent advances in our study of DNA unlinking by XerCD-FtsK.

XerC and XerD are site-specific recombinases of Escherichia coli. Replication of circular chromosomes requires unwinding of the DNA and results in the formation of DNA links. In Escherichia coli, error-free unlinking is required to ensure proper segregation at cell division. The site-specific recombination system XerCD mediates sister chromosome unlinking in TopoIV deficient cells. We provide formal proof that, under the model's assumptions, there is a unique pathway taking any torus link to the unlink.

This is joint work with Koya Shimokawa, Kai Ishihara, Ian Grainge, David J.Sherratt.
04:30 PM
05:30 PM
William Massey - David Blackwell Tribute: James Donaldson & William Massey
David Blackwell Tribute by James Donaldson and William Massey
Saturday, November 6, 2010
Time Session
09:00 AM
09:40 AM
Ariel Cintron-Arias - Parameter Selection for Inverse Problem Formulation
We propose an algorithm to select parameter combinations that can be estimated using an ordinary least-squares (OLS) inverse problem formulation with a given data set. First, the algorithm selects the parameter combinations that correspond to full-rank sensitivity matrices. Second, the algorithm involves uncertainty quantification by using the inverse of the Fisher Information Matrix. Nominal parameter values are used to explore the effects of removing certain parameters from those to be estimated using OLS procedures. The algorithm is illustrated with synthetic data of seasonal epidemics, real data of an influenza outbreak in a boarding school, real data of 1918 pandemic in San Francisco, and real data of HIV progression with treatment interruption.
09:45 AM
10:05 AM
- A new SIS malaria model with vector demography showing natural occurring oscillations
A new way to model the dynamics of malaria transmission that takes into consideration the demography of the transmitting vector will be presented. Model results indicate the existence of nontrivial disease free and endemic steady state solutions which can be driven to instability via a Hopf bifurcation as a parameter is varied in parameter space. The model therefore captures natural occurring oscillations known to occur in the dynamics of mosquito populations and these oscillations lead to oscillations in the dynamics of malaria transmission without recourse to external seasonal forcing, a way that has been used in the past to obtain such oscillations. Possible reasons why it has been difficult to eradicate malaria will also be discussed. The discovery of these natural occurring oscillatory dynamics present a plausible framework for developing and implementing control strategies. These will be discussed.
10:45 AM
11:25 AM
Juan Restrepo - Climate Change. When Data Fail Us
A central problem of Climate Variability is global warming. We are familiar with the controversy regarding its social and environmental implications. Much less so about where these controversies arise.

I will describe, first, one of the scenarios predicted by an increase in global temperatures. I will describe the role played by mathematics in climate research and will argue how mathematics must play a central role in answering the largest technical challenges posed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report: How confident are we about predictions of future climate scenarios?

I will describe why it is so difficult to pin down uncertainties in climate variability and will highlight some of the mathematical tools being developed to tackle these questions, including techniques developed by my group, the Uncertainty Quantification Group.
11:30 AM
11:50 AM
- Nonlinear partial differential equation and stochastic singular control
Nonlinear partial differential equations arise in stochastic optimal control via dynamic programming equations. In many cases, solutions of these equations aid in the design of optimal controls. We discuss a class of equations where the associated control processes are "singular" with respect to the time variable. These equations arise in models for spacecraft control, financial models that incorporate transaction costs, and in models of queueing systems.
01:15 PM
01:55 PM
Emery Brown - A Survey of Signal Processing Questions in Neuroscience
The study of the brain and the central nervous system is one of the fastest growing areas of science research. Neuroscience research uses a broad range of recording techniques and experimental paradigms including imaging, neurophysiology, and behavioral measurements. As a consequence, neuroscience is currently giving rise to a broad array of challenging signal processing questions. In this talk we survey some of current neuroscience signal processing questions.
02:00 PM
02:20 PM
- How can changes in protein isomer concentration trigger protein aggregation diseases?
Conformational diseases result from the failure of a specific protein to fold into its correct functional state. The misfolded proteins can lead to the toxic aggregation of proteins. In some cases, misfolded proteins interact with bystanders proteins (unfolded and native folded proteins), eliciting a misfolded phenotype. These bystander polypeptides would follow their normal physiological pathways in absence of misfolded proteins. In some conformational diseases, evidence suggests that bystander protein disappearance occurs through direct or indirect interaction with misfolded proteins, resulting in a transformation into aggregate-prone misfolded protein. Protein aggregation in conformational diseases often displays a threshold phenomenon characterized by a sudden shift between nontoxic and toxic levels of protein aggregates. We propose a general mechanism of bystander and misfolded protein interaction to investigate how the threshold phenomenon in protein aggregation is triggered in conformational diseases. Using a continuous flow reactor model of the endoplasmic reticulum, we derived the conditions necessary to produce threshold phenomena. Our results indicate that slight changes in the ratio of misfolded to bystander basal protein concentrations can trigger the threshold phenomena in protein aggregation. Our model proposes a general mechanism for the loss of function observed in certain conformational diseases. We also identify the conditions necessary to trigger the observed threshold phenomena in protein aggregation. Understanding the conditions necessary for the aggregation threshold phenomena is an important step towards developing therapeutic strategies targeting the modulation of conformational diseases.
03:15 PM
03:55 PM
- Young Women and Mathematical Biology: A Personal Perspective
Lee Segel one of the greatest applied mathematicians of our time passed away on January 31, 2005. His obituary (SIAM News, 03-10-2005) read "With his death, the applied mathematics community lost one of its finest practitioners, and the theoretical biology community lost a true pioneer who was still a leader at the cutting edge of so many subjects. And most importantly, the world community lost a true mensch, a compassionate and loving individual who inspired so many with his brilliance, his enthusiasm, his sense of humor, and his concern for others." Lee Segel was an extraordinary mentor of women and his former students include many leaders in the field of mathematical biology. In this talk through a series of examples, I will illustrate my experiences with women mathematicians at the undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral level as they engaged in research in mathematical biology. I will discuss their research as a prelude to the lecture of one of the most outstanding mathematical biologist, Trachette Jackson who chose to become a mathematician through the encouragement and support of the late Joaquin Bustoz Jr.
04:00 PM
05:00 PM
Trachette Jackson - The evolution of hybrid models of tumor angiogenesis
Motility -- random, directed and collective -- is a fundamental property of cells. Coordinated motility of endothelial cells that reside on the inner surface of blood vessels leads to a critical bifurcation point in cancer progression: tumor angiogenesis. Successful angiogenesis is a consequence of integration across multiple levels of biological organization, and several temporal and spatial scales. A major challenge facing the cancer research community is to integrate known information in a way that improves our understanding of the mechanisms driving tumor angiogenesis and that will advance efforts aimed at the development of new therapies for treating cancer.

In this talk, the evolution of spatio-temporal mathematical models of tumor angiogenesis will be explored and recent advances will be highlighted.
Name Affiliation
Aazami, Amir aazami@math.duke.edu Mathematics, Duke University
Abayomi, Kobi kobi@gatech.edu Industrial Engineering, Georgia Tech
Agusto, Folashade agusto@nimbios.org NIMBioS, University of Tennessee
Akcay, Zeynep za25@njit.edu Mathematics, New Jersey Inst. of Technology
Banuelos, Rodrigo banuelos@math.purdue.edu Mathematics, Purdue University
Brown, Emery enb@neurostat.mit.edu Computational Neuroscience, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Brown, Johnny jeb@math.purdue.edu Mathematics, Purdue University
Carden, Russell Russell.L.Carden@rice.edu Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University
Castillo-Chavez, Carlos ccchavez@asu.edu MCMSC, Arizona State University
Catalan, Paula pjc36@njit.edu Applied Mathematics, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Chamberlin, Helen chamberlin.27@osu.edu Molecular Genetics, The Ohio State University
Cintron-Arias, Ariel cintronarias@etsu.edu Mathematics and Statistics, East Tennessee State University
Colbert-Kelly, Sean scolbert@math.purdue.edu Mathematics, Purdue University
Cortez, Ricardo rcortez@tulane.edu Mathematics Dept., Tulane University
Cruz, Alfredo alfredcross@gmail.com Electrical & Computer Eng. and Computer Science, Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico
Donaldson, James jdonaldson@howard.edu College of Arts and Sciences, Howard University
Doumbia, Moussa doumbiassa@yahoo.fr Dept. of Mathematics, Howard University
Esunge, Julius jesunge@umw.edu Mathematics, Mary Washington College
Frank, Dennis dennis_frank@med.unc.edu Dept. of Otolaryngology/Head Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Fuqua, Jordan jordan.fuqua@morganstanley.com Recruiting/Human Resources, Morgan Stanley
Goins, Edray egoins@math.purdue.edu Department of Mathematics, Purdue University
Greene, Byron bgreene2@eastern.edu Nonprofit Management, Eastern University
Harry, April aharry@purdue.edu Dept. of Statistics, Purdue University
Herbers, Joan herbers.4@osu.edu Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, The Ohio State University
Herrera-Valdez, Marco Arieli Marco.Herrera-Valdez@asu.edu MCMSC, Arizona State University
Hicks, Illya ivhicks@rice.edu Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University
Hynd, Ryan rhynd@cims.nyu.edu CIMS, New York University
Jackson, Monica monica@drlady.com Mathematics and Statistics, American university
Jackson, Trachette tjacks@umich.edu Department of Mathematics, University of Michigan
Kemajou, Elisabeth isakema@aol.com Mathematics, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Kengwoung-Keumo, Jean-Jacques jjkengwk@nmsu.edu Mathematical Sciences, New Mexico State University
Klein, Kendra kendra.klein@morganstanley.com Recruiting/Human Resources, Morgan Stanley
Li, Nianpeng sylnp@hotmail.com Department of Mathematics, Howard University
Li, Tong tli@math.uiowa.edu Mathematics, University of Iowa
Lomelí, Luis lomeli@math.purdue.edu Mathematics, Purdue University
March, Peter march.2@osu.edu Divisional Dean, Natural & Mathematical Sciences, The Ohio State University
Massey, William wmassey@princeton.edu Operations Research and Financial Engineering, Princeton University
McCarthy, Maeve maeve.mccarthy@murraystate.edu Dept. of Mathematics & Statistics, Murray State University
McGee, Reginald reginaldmcgee@gmail.com Mathematics, Purdue University
Meza, Juan meza@hpcrd.lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, High Performance Computing Research
Miura, Robert miura@njit.edu Department of Mathematical Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Morton, Gregory gdm3@njit.edu Applied Mathematics, New Jersey Inst. of Technology
Nelson, Patrick pwm@umich.edu Center for Computational Medicine & Bioinformatics, University of Michigan
Ngonghala, Calistus ngonghala@yahoo.com Mathematics, West Virginia University
Nkwanta, Asamoah Asamoah.Nkwanta@morgan.edu Mathematics, Morgan State University
Ortiz, Ricardo ortiz@unc.edu Mathematics, University of North Carolina
Pal, Samares samaresp@gmail.com Mathematics, University of Kalyani
Pantula, Sastry spantula@nsf.gov Director, Division of Mathematical Sciences, National Science Foundation
Pararai, Mavis pararaim@iup.edu Mathematics, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Petters, Arlie arlie.petters@duke.edu Mathematics, Physics, and Business Administration, Duke University
Price, Candice candice.r.price@gmail.com Mathematics, University of Iowa
Rael, Rosalyn rrael@umich.edu Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan
Ramirez, Carlos carlosrv19@gmail.com Computational Science, The University of Texas at El Paso
Reed, Michael reed@math.duke.edu
Restrepo, Juan restrepo@physics.arizona.edu Department of Mathematics, University of Arizona
Reyna, Nabor nabor.reyna@gmail.com Dept. of Computational & Applied Math, Rice University
Rivera-Cruz, Joaquin jriveracruz@colgate.edu Mathematics, Colgate University
Sanchez, Reinaldo rsanchezarias@miners.utep.edu Mathematical Sciences, The University of Texas at El Paso
Sancier-Barbosa, Flavia fsancier@gmail.com Mathematics, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Sandefur, Conner sandefur@umich.edu Ctr. for Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan
Sandstede, Bjorn Bjorn_Sandstede@brown.edu Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University
Sellers, Kimberly kfs7@georgetown.edu Mathematics and Statistics, Georgetown University
Shakiban, Cheri shakiban@ima.umn.edu Institute for Mathematics and its Applications, University of Minnesota
Sifuentes, Josef sifuentes@cims.nyu.edu Courant Institute, New York University
Somersille, Stephanie steph@math.utexas.edu Mathematics, University of Texas at Austin
Sternberg, Michael michael.sternberg@morganstanley.com Recruiting/Human Resources, Morgan Stanley
Summer, Ilyssa Ilyssa.Summer@asu.edu Applied Mathematics, Arizona State University
Tapia, Richard neyra@rice.edu Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University
Teboh-Ewungkem, Miranda tebohewm@lafayette.edu Department of Mathematics, Lafayette College
Teguia, Alberto alberto@math.duke.edu Department of Mathematics, Duke University
Vazquez, Maria mariel@math.sfsu.edu Dept. of Mathematics, San Francisco State University
Velazquez, Leticia leti@utep.edu Mathematical Sciences, The University of Texas at El Paso
Walton, Chelsea notlaw@umich.edu Mathematics, University of Michigan
Washington, Talitha tw65@evansville.edu Mathematics, University of Evansville
Wiley, Shari shari_wiley@yahoo.com Dept. of Mathematics, Howard University
Wolfe, Douglas daw@stat.osu.edu Chair, Dept. of Statistics, The Ohio State University
Xie, Yonghong sosono@gmail.com CCMB, University of Michigan
Yakubu, Abdul-Aziz ayakubu@Howard.edu Dept. of Mathematics, Howard University
Yong, Kamuela kyong@math.uiowa.edu Mathematics, University of Iowa
Zamora, Azucena azamora3@miners.utep.edu Computational Science, University of Texas at El Paso
A Survey of Signal Processing Questions in Neuroscience
The study of the brain and the central nervous system is one of the fastest growing areas of science research. Neuroscience research uses a broad range of recording techniques and experimental paradigms including imaging, neurophysiology, and behavioral measurements. As a consequence, neuroscience is currently giving rise to a broad array of challenging signal processing questions. In this talk we survey some of current neuroscience signal processing questions.
Parameter Selection for Inverse Problem Formulation
We propose an algorithm to select parameter combinations that can be estimated using an ordinary least-squares (OLS) inverse problem formulation with a given data set. First, the algorithm selects the parameter combinations that correspond to full-rank sensitivity matrices. Second, the algorithm involves uncertainty quantification by using the inverse of the Fisher Information Matrix. Nominal parameter values are used to explore the effects of removing certain parameters from those to be estimated using OLS procedures. The algorithm is illustrated with synthetic data of seasonal epidemics, real data of an influenza outbreak in a boarding school, real data of 1918 pandemic in San Francisco, and real data of HIV progression with treatment interruption.
Simulation of flagellar motions using regularization methods
Biological flows, such as those surrounding swimming microorganisms, can be properly modeled using the Stokes equations for fluid motion with external forcing. The organism surfaces can be viewed as flexible interfaces imparting force or torque on the fluid. Interesting flows have been observed when the organism swims near a solid wall due to the hydrodynamic interaction of rotating flagella with a neighboring solid surface. I will present the Method of Regularized Stokeslets and some extensions of it that are used to compute these flows. The method includes the use of regularized rotlets and a system of images that exactly cancels the fluid velocity at the wall. The results show features such as an attraction towards the surface and rotations that generate a drag force that allows the flagellum to roll along the surface. Other computed flows resemble observed features of the flow when organisms are near the bottom of the plate in an experimental setting.
Optimization Techniques for Scheduling Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy for Early Stage Breast Cancer
Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the United States. Cancer treatments can be classified as local or systemic. Endocrine therapy is one form of systemic treatment for breast cancer. In this talk we utilize data from published clinical trial results in a mixed integer nonlinear programming model in order to detect an optimal treatment plan. The objective is to maximize the disease-free survival percentage at the end of the treatment subject to constraints dictated by the risk of several side effects. This joint work with Sera Kahruman, Elif Ulusal, Sergiy Butenko, and Kathleen Diehl.
The evolution of hybrid models of tumor angiogenesis
Motility -- random, directed and collective -- is a fundamental property of cells. Coordinated motility of endothelial cells that reside on the inner surface of blood vessels leads to a critical bifurcation point in cancer progression: tumor angiogenesis. Successful angiogenesis is a consequence of integration across multiple levels of biological organization, and several temporal and spatial scales. A major challenge facing the cancer research community is to integrate known information in a way that improves our understanding of the mechanisms driving tumor angiogenesis and that will advance efforts aimed at the development of new therapies for treating cancer.

In this talk, the evolution of spatio-temporal mathematical models of tumor angiogenesis will be explored and recent advances will be highlighted.
David Blackwell Tribute: James Donaldson & William Massey
David Blackwell Tribute by James Donaldson and William Massey
Climate Change. When Data Fail Us
A central problem of Climate Variability is global warming. We are familiar with the controversy regarding its social and environmental implications. Much less so about where these controversies arise.

I will describe, first, one of the scenarios predicted by an increase in global temperatures. I will describe the role played by mathematics in climate research and will argue how mathematics must play a central role in answering the largest technical challenges posed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report: How confident are we about predictions of future climate scenarios?

I will describe why it is so difficult to pin down uncertainties in climate variability and will highlight some of the mathematical tools being developed to tackle these questions, including techniques developed by my group, the Uncertainty Quantification Group.
Modeling DNA unlinking
Multiple cellular processes, such as DNA replication and transcription, affect the topology of DNA. Controlling these changes is key to ensuring stability inside the cell. Changes in DNA topology are mediated by enzymes, such as topoisomerases and site-specific recombinases. We use techniques from knot theory and low-dimensional topology, aided by computational tools, to analyze the action of such enzymes.

I will here present recent advances in our study of DNA unlinking by XerCD-FtsK.

XerC and XerD are site-specific recombinases of Escherichia coli. Replication of circular chromosomes requires unwinding of the DNA and results in the formation of DNA links. In Escherichia coli, error-free unlinking is required to ensure proper segregation at cell division. The site-specific recombination system XerCD mediates sister chromosome unlinking in TopoIV deficient cells. We provide formal proof that, under the model's assumptions, there is a unique pathway taking any torus link to the unlink.

This is joint work with Koya Shimokawa, Kai Ishihara, Ian Grainge, David J.Sherratt.
Galloping Gertie Revisited: Demystifying the Collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge
The Tacoma Narrows Bridge opened on July 1, 1940 in the state of Washington. The bridge earned the name "Galloping Gertie" because it could be seen oscillating up and down. On November 7, 1940, wind gusts with speeds of only 40 miles per hour caused the bridge to collapse into the Pugent Sound. In 1999, Dr. P. Joseph McKenna presented a model that described the bridge's motion and reasons for its collapse. Since his model negated previous theories, a "genteel professorial catfight" broke out between McKenna and some engineers. This talk will examine theories and controversy that surround the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. This debate still persists in many undergraduate textbooks.
video image

Young Women and Mathematical Biology: A Personal Perspective
Carlos Castillo-Chavez Lee Segel one of the greatest applied mathematicians of our time passed away on January 31, 2005. His obituary (SIAM News, 03-10-2005) read "With his death, the applied mathematics community lost one of its finest practitioners, and the theoreti

video image

How can changes in protein isomer concentration trigger protein aggregation diseases?
Conner Sandefur Conformational diseases result from the failure of a specific protein to fold into its correct functional state. The misfolded proteins can lead to the toxic aggregation of proteins. In some cases, misfolded proteins interact with bystanders proteins

video image

Nonlinear partial differential equation and stochastic singular control
Ryan Hynd Nonlinear partial differential equations arise in stochastic optimal control via dynamic programming equations. In many cases, solutions of these equations aid in the design of optimal controls. We discuss a class of equations where the associated co

video image

A new SIS malaria model with vector demography showing natural occurring oscillations
Miranda Teboh-Ewungkem A new way to model the dynamics of malaria transmission that takes into consideration the demography of the transmitting vector will be presented. Model results indicate the existence of nontrivial disease free and endemic steady state solutions whic

video image

Yes, Even You Can Bend It Like Beckham
Edray Goins In the 2002 film by Gurinder Chadha, character Jesminder 'Jess' Bhamra states "No one can cross a ball or bend it like Beckham" in a reference to the international soccer star's ability to cause the ball to swerve. French res