Modeling the spread of waterborne disease: the role of heterogeneity in dual transmission pathways

Suzanne Robertson
MBI - postdoc, The Ohio State University

(March 29, 2012 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM)

Modeling the spread of waterborne disease: the role of heterogeneity in dual transmission pathways

Abstract

Cholera, a waterborne diarrheal disease, is a major public health threat in many parts of the world. It is spread via direct contact with infected individuals as well as indirectly through a contaminated water source. Cholera dynamics can be described by the SIWR model, a modified SIR model incorporating an equation to track the concentration of the pathogen in the water (W) and the additional water transmission pathway. Factors affecting both transmission rates are likely to vary among different populations. Here we consider a multi-patch SIWR model, specifically a system of non-mixing patches sharing a common water source, and explore the effect of heterogeneity in transmission on the spread of the disease, as well as the implications for control.