Computational Human Ventricle Models for Surgical Optimization Based on Patient-Specific Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Dalin Tang
Department of Mathematical Sciences, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

(October 17, 2011 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM)

Computational Human Ventricle Models for Surgical Optimization Based on Patient-Specific Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Abstract

In this talk we use a realistic model to demonstrate how mathematics can be applied in real-life applications. An image-based human heart model with fluid-structure interactions (FSI) was introduced to evaluate human heart cardiac function before and after surgery and optimize human pulmonary valve replacement/insertion (PVR) surgical procedure and patch design. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR) imaging studies were performed to acquire ventricle geometry, flow velocity and flow rate for healthy volunteers and patients needing right ventricle (RV) remodeling and PVR before and after scheduled surgeries. CMR-based RV/LV/Patch FSI models were constructed to perform mechanical analysis and provide accurate assessment for RV mechanical conditions and cardiac function. These models include a) fluid-structure interactions, b) isotropic and anisotropic material properties, c) two-layer construction with myocardial fiber orientation, and d) active contraction. When validated, the computational modeling approach could be used to replace actual surgical experiments on real patients by "virtual" surgery using computational simulations to optimize surgical outcome. Acknowledgement: This research was in collaboration with Pedro Del Nido, MD, William E. Ladd Professor of Surgery, Chairman of Cardiac Surgery, and Tal Geva, MD, Director of Cardiac MRI Department, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, USA. It was supported in part by NIH R01 HL089269 (del Nido, Tang, Geva), NIH-R01 HL63095 (PJdN), and NIH- 5P50 HL074734 (Clinical Trial, PI-Geva).