Directed Cell Migration: Experiments and Modeling

Mingming Wu
Biofluidics Lab, Cornell University

(March 12, 2013 3:00 PM - 3:50 PM)

Directed Cell Migration: Experiments and Modeling

Abstract

Directed cell migration, where cells migrate up/down chemical (e. g. chemokines, growth factors) or physical (e. g. stress, temperature) gradients, play important roles in a number of physiological processes; they include immune responses, tissue formation and cancer metastasis. In this talk, I will present work in my lab in understanding biophysical and biochemical mechanisms that cells use to migrate when subject to single or dual chemical gradients using an integrated experimental and theoretical modeling approach. Two examples will be given. First, I will describe how bacteria can sense chemical concentration gradients at a logarithmic scale; similar to sensory systems in high organism, such as human hearing and vision. I will also talk about how bacteria make movement decisions when subject to competing chemical gradients. Second, I will discuss about the roles of receptor-ligand binding kinetics in immune and cancer cell migration, and their implications in cancer metastasis.