Workshop 2: Metastasis and Angiogenesis

(October 13,2014 - October 17,2014 )

Organizers


Mark Chaplain
Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee
Trachette Jackson
Department of Mathematics, University of Michigan
Lance Munn
Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital & Harvard Medical School
Hans Othmer
School of Mathematics, University of Minnesota

Initially solid tumors are avascular, i.e., they do not have their own blood supply, and rely on diffusion from the surrounding vasculature to supply oxygen and nutrients. When the tumor becomes too large diffusion is too slow, growth in the core stops, and can resume only if the tumor becomes vascularized i.e. if it becomes permeated with a network of capillaries. Avascular tumors release growth factors into their environment to induce nearby blood vessels to grow new capillaries to vascularize the tumor through a process called angiogenesis. This results in the creation of a new capillary network that extends from a primary vessel into the growth-factor-secreting tumor, thereby bringing essential nutrients to the tumor and providing a shorter route for the spread of cancer cells to other parts of the body. Metastasis is the process by which tumor cells detach from a primary tumor and migrate to nearby blood vessels or the lymph system, and are thereby able to spread to other organs in the host. Cancer cells invade the surrounding tissue either as individuals or as small groups of cells, and may secrete enzymes that degrade the ECM to facilitate passage of cells. This workshop will address the mathematical and computational issues that arise from models of angiogenesis and metastasis. Such models are frequently hybrid models, that describe cells (either those building the vessel or those involved in metastasis) at a detailed level that treats their biochemical and mechanical responses to their environment, and couple this cell-based description with partial differential equations that describe the mechanics of the surrounding tissue and the reaction and transport of growth factors and chemotactic signals. Major topics to be treated are how to model the movement of single cells through the extracellular matrix, how to describe in sufficient detail the process by which new vessels grow toward a tumor, how to cope with the computational problems raised by such hybrid models, and what the implications are for our understanding of the underlying basic science and how that understanding can be translated into improved therapeutic regimens.

Accepted Speakers

Tomas Alarcon
Computational & Mathematical Biology,
Jim Baish
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Bucknell University
Paul Bates
Biomolecular Modelling Laboratory, London Research Institute
Katie Bentley
pathology, Beth Israel Hospital, Harvard Medical School
Vincenzo Capasso
Mathematics, University of Milan
Vittorio Cristini
School of Health Information Sciences, University of Texas
Dirk Drasdo
Bioinformatics, Physical and Mathematical Biology, Institut National de Recherche en Informatique Automatique (INRIA)
Hermann Frieboes
Bionegineering, University of Louisville
Peter Friedl
Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
Alf Gerisch
Fachbereich Mathematik, Technische Universität Darmstadt
James Glazier
Biocomplexity Institute, Department of Physics, Indiana University
Thomas Hillen
Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, University of Alberta
Yangjin Kim
Department of Mathematics, Konkuk University
Petros Koumoutsakos
Computational Science, ETHZ
John Lowengrub
Mathematics, University of California, Irvine
Stephen McDougall
Institute of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt University
Aleksander Popel
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University
Luigi Preziosi
Department of Mathematics, Politecnico di Torino
Axel Pries
Dept. of Physiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin
Andy South
Division of Cancer Research, University of Dundee
Triantafyllos Stylianopoulos
Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus
Kristin Swanson
Neurological Surgery, Northwestern University
Zuzanna Szymańska
ICM, University of Warsaw
Monday, October 13, 2014
Time Session
Tuesday, October 14, 2014
Time Session
Wednesday, October 15, 2014
Time Session
Thursday, October 16, 2014
Time Session
Friday, October 17, 2014
Time Session
Name Affiliation
Alarcon, Tomas talarcon@crm.cat Computational & Mathematical Biology,
Alber, Mark malber@nd.edu Applied Mathematics, University of Notre Dame
Baish, Jame baish@bucknell.edu Department of Biomedical Engineering, Bucknell University
Bates, Paul paul.bates@cancer.org.uk Biomolecular Modelling Laboratory, London Research Institute
Bentley, Katie kbentley@bidmc.harvard.edu pathology, Beth Israel Hospital, Harvard Medical School
Capasso, Vincenzo vincenzo.capasso@unimi.it Mathematics, University of Milan
Chaplain, Mark chaplain@maths.dundee.ac.uk Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee
Cristini, Vittorio VCristini@salud.unm.edu School of Health Information Sciences, University of Texas
Cytowski, Maciej m.cytowski@icm.edu.pl
Drasdo, Dirk dirk.drasdo@inria.fr Bioinformatics, Physical and Mathematical Biology, Institut National de Recherche en Informatique Automatique (INRIA)
Frieboes, Hermann hbfrie01@louisville.edu Bionegineering, University of Louisville
Friedl, Peter P.Friedl@ncmls.ru.nl Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
Gerisch, Alf gerisch@mathematik.tu-darmstadt.de Fachbereich Mathematik, Technische Universität Darmstadt
Glazier , James glazier@indiana.edu Biocomplexity Institute, Department of Physics, Indiana University
Hillen, Thomas thillen@ualberta.ca Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, University of Alberta
Jackson, Trachette tjacks@umich.edu Department of Mathematics, University of Michigan
Jiang, Yi yjiang12@gsu.edu Mathematics and Statistics, Georgia State University
Jordan, Benjamin bjordan@oeb.harvard.edu School of Mathematics, University of Minnesota
Kim, Yangjin ahyouhappy@konkuk.ac.kr Department of Mathematics, Konkuk University
Koumoutsakos, Petros petros@ethz.ch Computational Science, ETHZ
Long, Quan quan.long@brunel.ac.uk Brunel Institute for Bioengineering, Brunel University
Lowengrub, John lowengrb@math.uci.edu Mathematics, University of California, Irvine
McDougall, Steven steve.mcdougall@pet.hw.ac.uk Institute of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt University
Munn, Lance lance@steele.mgh.harvard.edu Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital & Harvard Medical School
Othmer, Hans othmer@math.umn.edu School of Mathematics, University of Minnesota
Ponce de Leon, Marco ponce018@umn.edu Mathematics, University of Minnesota
Popel, Aleksander apopel@jhu.edu Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University
Preziosi, Luigi luigi.preziosi@polito.it Department of Mathematics, Politecnico di Torino
Pries, Axel axel.pries@charite.de Dept. of Physiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin
Ramis-Conde, Ignacio ignacio.ramis@uclm.es
Rieger, Heiko h.rieger@mx.uni-saarland.de
Roose, Tiina t.roose@soton.ac.uk Bioengineering, University of Southampton
Secomb, Timothy secomb@u.arizona.edu Physiology, University of Arizona
Sivaloganathan, Siv ssivalog@math.uwaterloo.ca Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo
South, Andy a.p.south@dundee.ac.uk Division of Cancer Research, University of Dundee
Stolarska, Magdalena mastolarska@stthomas.edu Mathematics, University of St. Thomas
Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos tstylian@ucy.ac.cy Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus
Swanson, Kristin kristin.swanson@northwestern.edu Neurological Surgery, Northwestern University
Szymańska, Zuzanna szymanska@gmail.com ICM, University of Warsaw
Wang, Qixuan qixuanw@math.uci.edu math, University of California, Irvine
Zaman, Muhammad zaman@bu.edu Department of Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, University of Texas