Central Problems in Biological Clocks: Identification Structures of Biochemical Networks and Understanding Functions of Biochemical Networks

Jae Kyoung Kim
Mathematical Biosciences Institute, The Ohio State University

(September 12, 2013 10:20 AM - 11:15 AM)

Central Problems in Biological Clocks: Identification Structures of Biochemical Networks and Understanding Functions of Biochemical Networks

Abstract

Cells generate various biological rhythms that control important aspects of cell physiology including circadian (daily) events, cell division, embryogenesis, DNA damage repair and metabolism. Since these cellular rhythms can determine the fitness or fate of organisms, how cells generate and control rhythms has become a central problem in biology. While recent experimental work has identified many genes and proteins that are involved in biological clocks, identification of entire biochemical network seems far from complete since current experimental techniques require tremendous amount of work. On the other hand, output of the networks, timecourses of genes and proteins can be easily acquired with advances in technology. I will describe how to use these timecourse data to reveal biochemical network structure by using a fixed-point criteria. Moreover, the structures of biochemical networks are tightly related with their functions. I will discuss how the structures of biochemical network play role in maintaining rhythms and regulating period over a wide range of conditions with two examples: circadian rhythms and p53 rhythms.