Upcoming Postdoc Seminars

All seminars will be held in the MBI Lecture Hall - Jennings Hall, Room 355 - unless otherwise noted.

March 05, 2015 10:20 - 11:15AM

Abstract Not Submitted

TBD
March 12, 2015 10:20 - 11:15AM

Abstract Not Submitted

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March 19, 2015 10:20 - 11:15AM

Abstract Not Submitted

TBD
April 02, 2015 10:20 - 11:15AM

Abstract Not Submitted

TBD
April 09, 2015 10:20 - 11:15AM

Abstract Not Submitted

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April 23, 2015 10:20 - 11:15AM

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TBD
May 07, 2015 10:20 - 11:15AM

Abstract Not Submitted

May 14, 2015 10:20 - 11:15AM

During forward swimming, pairs of crayfish swimmerets (limbs) exhibit a robust pattern, moving rhythmically in a back to front metachronal wave with neighbors delayed by approximately 25% of the period. We study the mechanism responsible for this coordinated limb behavior using a model which represents the underlying neural circuitry as a chain of coupled oscillators. Previous modeling efforts have only considered the effects of nearest neighbor coupling, ignoring the presence of longer range connections in the system.

In this talk, we address how long-range coupling affects this mechanism, using an oscillator chain whose architecture reflects the known neural circuitry in the swimmeret system. Results from analytical arguments and numerical simulations indicate that long-range coupling tends to speed up the metachronal wave, and we suggest that this may maximize swimming efficiency.

Upcoming Visitor Seminars

March 03, 2015 10:20 - 11:10AM

Cell-to-cell communication is fundamental to biological processes which require cells to coordinate their functions. A simple strategy adopted by many biological systems to achieve this communication is through cell signaling, in which extracellular signaling molecules released by one cell are detected by other cells via specific mechanisms. These signal molecules activate intracellular pathways to induce cellular responses such as cell motility or cell morphological changes. Proper communication thus relies on precise control and coordination of all these actions.

The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a unicellular fungi, has been a model system for studying cell-to-cell communication during mating because of its genetic tractability. In this work, we performed for the first time computer simulations of the yeast mating process. Our computational framework encompassed a moving boundary method for modeling cell shape changes, the extracellular diffusion of mating pheromones, a generic reaction-diffusion model of yeast cell polarization, and both external and internal noise. Computer simulations revealed important robustness strategies for mating in the presence of noise. These strategies included the polarized secretion of pheromone, the presence of the lpha-factor protease Bar1, and the regulation of sensing sensitivity; all were consistent with data in the literature. In summary, we constructed a framework for simulating yeast mating and cell-cell interactions more generally, and we used this framework to reproduce yeast mating behaviors qualitatively and to identify strategies for robust mating.

TBD
March 10, 2015 10:20 - 11:10AM
Host: TBD

Abstract not submitted.

TBD
March 17, 2015 10:20 - 11:10AM
Host: TBD

Abstract not submitted.

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March 31, 2015 10:20 - 11:10AM
Host: TBD

Abstract not submitted.

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April 07, 2015 10:20 - 11:10AM
Host: TBD

Abstract not submitted.

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April 21, 2015 10:20 - 11:10AM
Host: TBD

Abstract not submitted

TBD
May 05, 2015 10:20 - 11:10AM
Host: TBD

Abstract not submitted.

TBD
May 12, 2015 10:20 - 11:10AM
Host: TBD

Abstract not submitted.

TBD
May 19, 2015 10:20 - 11:10AM
Host: TBD

Abstract not submitted.

upcoming special seminars