Tracking dynamic innate immune responses in experimental malaria infection

Rabindra Tirouvanziam (April 10, 2014)

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Slides

0:04 Tracking dynamic innate immune responses in eperimental malaria infection
2:22 Outline
3:32 Host / parasite interactions (1)
3:46 Host / parasite interactions (2)
5:21 Host / parasite interactions (3)
10:32 Host / parasite interactions (4)
12:47 Host / parasite interactions (5)
13:02 Host / parasite interactions (6)
13:22 Host / parasite interactions (7)
15:33 Innate and adaptive immunity: overview
15:56 ate and adaptive immunity: overview (2)
15:58 ate and adaptive immunity: overview (3)
17:16 ate and adaptive immunity: overview (4)
18:01 ate and adaptive immunity: overview (5)
19:57 MaHPIC Innate Immunity Core (1)
20:41 MaHPIC Innate Immunity Core (2)
20:48 Custom protocol
22:04 Cytometry probes: a wide array to pick from
23:46 Custom assays
24:17 Assessing specific subsets in blood (25 μl)
25:01 EX13: Caspase-1 in blood neutrophils
25:59 Outline
26:06 EX04: Caspase-1 in blood neutrophils
26:40 EX04: neutrophil function (baseline) (1)
28:52 EX04: neutrophil function (baseline) (2)
29:15 EX04: leukocyte subset function (baseline) (1)
29:47 EX04: leukocyte subset function (baseline) 21)
30:18 EX04: leukocyte subset function (baseline) (3)
31:00 EX04: neutrophil function (added bacteria) (1)
31:16 04: neutrophil function (added bacteria) (2)
31:28 04: neutrophil function (added bacteria) (3)
31:47 Data output and sharing (1)
32:11 Data output and sharing (2)
32:21 Omics integration
33:01 MaHPIC: onward and beyond (1)
33:17 MaHPIC: onward and beyond (2)
33:27 MaHPIC: onward and beyond (3)
34:03 MaHPIC: onward and beyond (4)
34:06 MaHPIC: onward and beyond (5)
34:12 Host / parasite interactions (1)
34:21 Host / parasite interactions (2)
34:32 Host / parasite interactions (3)
34:40 Acknowledgments
34:52 Q & A

Abstract

Experimental malaria infections in non-human primates (NHPs) are a prime setting to assess the changing biological conditions associated with disease, notably with regards to the host immune system. While much attention has been focused on T-cell and B-cell dependent ("adaptive") responses that are key to vaccine development and long-term protection in malaria, relatively little is known of the involvement of the innate immune system. Here, we will highlight a novel approach that addresses this gap in knowledge, and will show early data obtained as part of the Malaria Host Pathogen Interaction Center (MaHPIC) consortium at Emory University, Georgia Tech and University of Georgia (PI: Mary Galinski, Co-PIs: Alberto Moreno, Jessica Kissinger). By tracking functional responses mounted by the innate immune system in malaria-infected NHPs, we show that this arm of the immune system is mobilized to a major extent during the course of infection. This data is the first of its kind and will be discussed in relation to integration with other omics technologies and use in building mathematical models that include both adaptive and innate host immunity.


Chet Joyner, Mary Galinski, Rabindra Tirouvanziam, Emory University