Some effects of host movement in vector-borne disease systems

Chris Cosner (April 10, 2014)

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Slides

0:04 Some effects of host movements in vector-borne disease systems
1:23 Single Patch Model (Ross-Macdonald type)
2:07 Spatial Models
5:35 Eulcrian Models in Discrete Space
7:00 Eulcrian Models in Continuous Space
9:33 Eulerian Models with Epidemiology
13:05 Eulerian Models with Epidemiology Continued
14:33 Lagrangian Models in Discrete Space
16:46 More on Lagrangian Models
18:27 More on Lagrangian Models
25:26 Some results: Eulerian Models
28:39 Some results: Eulerian Models
29:19 Lagrangian Models in Discrete Space
29:29 More on Lagrangian Models
29:37 Some results: Eulerian Models
30:45 Some Related Work
33:23 What about mosquito movement?
34:19 References

Abstract

Host movements can have a profound impact on the transmission of vector-borne diseases because they can increase or reduce he rate of contact between hosts and vectors. It is clear that host movement can introduce pathogens to new environments, but models suggest that it can also increase or decrease the basic reproduction number (R0) within an environment by influencing the contact rates between hosts and infected vectors or between vectors and infected hosts. There are two distinct types of movement that are relevant in this context. They can be characterized as commuting and migration. The distinction is that migration envisions hosts changing the location of their primary residence, while commuting envisions that each host maintains a particular location of residence but visits other locations in the course of routine activities. These two types of movement require different models and may have different effects. This talk will review some models and results for the effects of host movement in vector-borne disease systems.