Rules of Life Follow-Up Workshop on the Emergence of Cell Differentiation in Early Multicellular Evolution

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November 15 - November 17, 2019
9:00AM - 5:00PM
Location
MBI Conference Room, Jennings Hall 360

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2019-11-15 09:00:00 2019-11-17 17:00:00 Rules of Life Follow-Up Workshop on the Emergence of Cell Differentiation in Early Multicellular Evolution

Follow-up meetings to the MBI Summit on the Rules of Life will take a more in-depth look at certain topics within the broader theme. In this first follow-up, a focused working group will more deeply explore the emergence of cell differentiation in early multicellular evolution.

The evolution of multicellularity is one of the major evolutionary transitions and enabled the increase in biological complexity in diverse lineages. A major feature of biological complexity in multicellular organisms is the evolution of cell differentiation, which allows for a richer functionality from a single genotype.

An important question is to know what mechanisms promoted the emergence and evolution of cellular differentiation in nascent multicellular organisms. A common view is that there are selection advantages for functional specialization, and therefore natural selection acts promoting phenotype heterogeneities within multicellular organisms.

This workshop will  test the hypothesis that cellular differentiation can emerge from a neutral process, in which cells communicate with neighboring cells, and this process can make cellular behaviors diverge, and consequently promote cell differentiation.

 

MBI Conference Room, Jennings Hall 360 Mathematical Biosciences Institute mbi-webmaster@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Follow-up meetings to the MBI Summit on the Rules of Life will take a more in-depth look at certain topics within the broader theme. In this first follow-up, a focused working group will more deeply explore the emergence of cell differentiation in early multicellular evolution.

The evolution of multicellularity is one of the major evolutionary transitions and enabled the increase in biological complexity in diverse lineages. A major feature of biological complexity in multicellular organisms is the evolution of cell differentiation, which allows for a richer functionality from a single genotype.

An important question is to know what mechanisms promoted the emergence and evolution of cellular differentiation in nascent multicellular organisms. A common view is that there are selection advantages for functional specialization, and therefore natural selection acts promoting phenotype heterogeneities within multicellular organisms.

This workshop will  test the hypothesis that cellular differentiation can emerge from a neutral process, in which cells communicate with neighboring cells, and this process can make cellular behaviors diverge, and consequently promote cell differentiation.

 

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Participants

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Name Affiliation Email
Marcella Gomez Department of Applied Mathematics, University of California, Santa Cruz mgomez26@ucsc.edu
Pedro Marquez Zacarias School of Biological Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology pedromaz@gatech.edu
David Murrugarra Department of Mathematics, University of Kentucky murrugarra@uky.edu
Ted Pavlic School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering/School of Sustainability/School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University tpavlic@asu.edu
Rozenn Pineau School of Biological Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology rpineau3@gatech.edu
Alan Veliz-Cuba Department of Mathematics, University of Dayton avelizcuba1@udayton.edu
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This workshop is supported by the National Science Foundation Division of Mathematical Sciences (DMS) and Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO) through the Understanding the Rules of Life Activities at NSF.

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